All Work

download this page (pdf: 224K | doc: 108K)

What is Vocational Rehabilitation?*

Vocational Rehabilitation agencies, often referred to as “VR”, are in every state. VR helps people with disabilities prepare and look for a job. VR was created out of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. VR programs are run by state agencies. They are designed to help people with disabilities meet their career goals. They help people with disabilities get jobs, whether the person is born with a disability, develops a disability or becomes a person with a disability while working.

Vocational Rehabilitation Services [what they can help you with]

  • Eligibility Determination: Helps you to figure out if you can actually get the services
  • Assessment of vocational needs – Finds out about your interests, skill and services you may need
  • Development of your Individualized Plan for Employment – Outline of your goals and the services you need/will receive
  • Coordination of services – Helps in getting the services you need to reach your goals
  • Post-employment services – Helps you keep your job once you get it

Do you qualify for services from VR?

According to the federal government, if you are:

  • An “individual with a disability”, meaning a person who
    • Has a physical or mental disability that is a sizable (big) obstacle (block) to getting a job
    • o Can benefit from VR services to get a job
  • An individual who needs VR services to prepare for, get or keep a job
  • If you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and/or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, you can receive VR services.

Vocational Rehabilitation services may be different from state to state. To find your state VR, see this website, www.jan.wvu.edu/SBSES/VOCREHAB.HTM. You can find your state and click on it for information about how to get in touch with them to find out more.

*Translated from “Getting the Most from the Public Vocational Rehabilitation System”, by Colleen Condon, Cecilia Gandolfo, Lora Brugnaro, Cindy Thomas and Pauline Donnelly for the Institute for Community Inclusion


download this page (pdf: 47K | doc: 102K | doc: en español)

Getting a Job: Building Your Interview Skills

Filling out a job application and creating a resume are only two parts to getting a job. Another important part is how you interview. People with disabilities communicate in many different ways, but it all means the same at the end.  Some may have limited verbal communication, but may use a speech board, an interpreter, or another form of communication. Making a good impression during a job interview doesn’t only include how you answer questions.  Here are some other ways to shine during the job interview process.

  • Come Prepared
    Coming prepared to a job interview includes bringing a copy of your resume and the names and contact information for two or three references. References are people who you feel would give positive information about you and have known you for two or more years. Your list should include people who are not related to you, like a past co-worker, a friend’s parents, a school advisor or a community leader. You should also try to learn as much as you can about the place you are applying before the interview. Looking online at their website or reading brochures, etc. can help you know how your skills could be helpful to them.
  • Be On Time
    It’s better to be early than late. If the interview is at a place that you are unsure of, give yourself plenty of extra time to get there. If you are arranging a ride on paratransit or through a friend, make sure to plan your trip in advance. Do your “homework.” Find out how many miles it is away from your home, and think about whether or not you’ll be traveling during high traffic hours. The last thing you want to do at an interview is explain why you were late. Getting to the interview on time leaves the impression that you are punctual and dependable.
  • Dress Appropriately and Be Well Groomed
    The way you look at an interview is the way you will be remembered.  Dress the part. Wearing a button-down, collared shirt or a dressy sweater with nice pants or a skirt and dress shoes is preferable. If you are going to interview for a ‘high level’ or professional job, wearing a suit may be more appropriate. Avoid clothes that may be more memorable than what you say.  You do not want the person interviewing you to be so distracted by your outfit or hairstyle that they cannot hear what you are talking about.  Stay away from clothing with flashy colors and slogans. Neatly brushing your hair, maintaining fresh breath, and having clean hands are also important. If you are a manual wheelchair user, you may want to have some hand wipes nearby to clean your hands before you go into the interview.  And NO gum chewing!
  • Ask Questions as Needed
    If you have done your research before the interview, you may have questions about the tasks you will be expected to perform, expectations of the job or even the benefits.  There should be time during the interview, usually near the end, where you can ask these questions.

It’s common to feel nervous and anxious during an interview.  Know your rights in an interview. There are questions that are illegal for employers to ask, including questions about your disability, your marital status, your age (unless there is an age requirement for the job, then they can ask you if you are over a certain age), or if you have children.

An employer can ask if you will be able to do a job with reasonable accommodations. Reasonable accommodations mean that you can do the job using some adaptations or piece of equipment (assistive technology). For example, using a speech recognition program to type documents on a computer or using a stool to sit behind a counter instead of standing.  You should let the employer know that you can do the job with reasonable accommodations if they ask but then talk in detail about it after you are hired. 

After the interview, it is good manners to send a thank you note to each person that interviewed you.  The note does not need to be lengthy but should acknowledge that someone took the time to talk with you and should remind him or her that you are interested and available to answer any more questions.  This can also go a long way to helping your resume float to the top of the pile!

Esta página en español.

descargue esta página (pdf: 47K | doc: 102K)

Para obtener un trabajo:  Cómo mejorar las destrezas necesarias para una entrevista


Llenar un formulario de solicitud de empleo y redactar un currículum vitae son tan solo dos de las etapas necesarias para obtener un trabajo. Otra parte importante es la entrevista. Las personas con discapacidades se comunican de muchas maneras diferentes, pero todo es lo mismo al final.  Algunos pueden tener una comunicación verbal limitada, pero pueden usar un tablero de producción de habla, un intérprete u otra forma de comunicación. La manera en que se responden las preguntas no es lo única forma de causar una buena impresión durante la entrevista para un trabajo.  Aquí encontrarás sugerencias para que te destaques durante el proceso de la entrevista.

  • Ir preparado

Ir preparado a una entrevista para un empleo incluye llevar una copia de tu currículum vitae y los nombres e información para contactar a dos o tres referencias. Las referencias son las personas que están dispuestas a dar información positiva acerca de ti y que te conocen desde al menos dos años. Tu lista debería incluir a personas que no sean tus familiares, tales como un compañero de trabajo previo, los padres de un amigo, un orientador de la escuela o un líder de la comunidad. Además, antes de la entrevista deberías tratar de informarte lo más posible acerca del lugar donde estás solicitando el trabajo. Puedes buscar en el sitio Web de dicho lugar o leer sus folletos para saber de qué manera tus destrezas podrían ser útiles para ellos.

  • Llegar puntualmente

Es mejor llegar adelantado que tarde. Si la entrevista se va a llevar a cabo en un lugar que no conoces, calcula tiempo adicional  para llegar. Si estás consiguiendo transporte a través de un servicio de transporte público o con algún amigo, asegúrate de planear tu viaje con anticipación. Investiga por tu cuenta.  Calcula a cuántas millas de tu hogar se encuentra el lugar de la entrevista y piensa si vas a ir durante las horas de mayor tráfico o no. Lo que menos quieres en una entrevista es tener que explicar por qué llegaste tarde. Llegar a la entrevista a la hora da la impresión de que eres puntual y confiable.

  • Ir limpio y bien vestido

Te recordarán de la manera en que te vieron durante la entrevista.  Vístete apropiadamente. Es preferible llevar una camisa con cuello o un suéter más formal con unos buenos pantalones o una falda y zapatos de vestir. Si vas a una entrevista para un trabajo de ‘alto nivel’ o un trabajo profesional, sería más apropiado vestir un traje. No es bueno que te recuerden más por la ropa que llevas que por lo que has dicho. Tú no quieres que la persona que te está entrevistando se distraiga con tu ropa o con tu peinado y que no pueda poner atención a lo que estás diciendo.  Mantente alejado de la ropa de colores muy llamativos o con consignas. También es importante que cepilles tu cabello cuidadosamente, que mantengas un aliento fresco y las manos limpias. Si utilizas una silla de ruedas manual, quizás desees llevar toallitas de papel húmedas para limpiarte las manos antes de la entrevista.  ¡Y OLVÍDATE de la goma de mascar!

  • Formular las preguntas necesarias

Si has llevado a cabo tus investigaciones antes de la entrevista, es posible que tengas preguntas acerca del trabajo que se espera que realices, de las expectativas e incluso de los beneficios.  Debería haber tiempo durante la entrevista, generalmente cerca del final, para que formules estas preguntas.

Es común sentirse nervioso y ansioso durante una entrevista.  Tienes que saber cuáles son tus derechos en una entrevista. Es ilícito que los empleadores hagan algún tipo de preguntas, incluso preguntas acerca de tu discapacidad, estado civil, edad (a menos que exista un requisito de edad para el empleo, en ese caso pueden preguntar si eres mayor de cierta edad) o si tienes hijos.

Un empleador puede preguntar si vas a ser capaz de realizar un trabajo con adaptaciones razonables. Adaptaciones razonables significa que puedes realizar el trabajo utilizando algunas adaptaciones o equipos (tecnología auxiliar). Por ejemplo, usar un programa de reconocimiento de habla para escribir documentos en una computadora o usar un taburete para sentarte detrás de un mostrador en vez de permanecer de pie.  Tú deberías comunicarle al empleador que puedes realizar el trabajo con adaptaciones razonables si es que te preguntan, pero debes hablar con detalles acerca de eso cuando te hayan contratado. 

Después de la entrevista, es signo de buena educación enviar una tarjeta de agradecimiento a todas las personas que te entrevistaron.  La tarjeta no necesita ser larga pero debe agradecer a la persona que dedicó su tiempo a hablar contigo y debe recordarle que tu estás interesado en el trabajo y que te encuentras disponible para responder cualquier pregunta adicional.  ¡Esto puede ayudar mucho a que tu currículum vitae pase a un lugar más visible, sobre los demás que se encuentran apilados en un escritorio!

download this page (pdf: 46K | doc: 80K)

Para obtener un trabajo:  Referencias profesionales y personales

Cuando se está solicitando un trabajo, es importante tener referencias personales y profesionales. Las referencias son las personas que pueden hablar de tus destrezas y de la experiencia en el trabajo, son personas que en tu opinión te conocen bien y que estarían dispuestas a hablar de tus cualidades en el trabajo o en general. Si ya has enviado una solicitud para un empleo y estás listo para una entrevista, deberías preparar una lista de referencias profesionales y/o personales. 

Muchos empleadores piden referencias, ya sea separadamente o en la misma solicitud de empleo, durante o después de la entrevista. A veces no piden referencias hasta después de citarte para una segunda entrevista. Así es, algunos empleadores no te entrevistarán una vez sino dos para asegurarse de que han seleccionado a la persona correcta para el trabajo. Para que puedas tener tu hoja de referencias lista para ser presentada, primero debes preguntarles a las personas de tu lista si estarían dispuestas a decir algo positivo acerca de ti.   Estos son algunos de los pasos que debes seguir al comienzo:

  • Contacta de 3 a 5 personas con las que hayas trabajado o realizado trabajo en calidad de voluntario y que conozcas por lo menos desde hace dos años. También puedes incluir a un consejero de la escuela, a un maestro, etc.
  • En la lista anota el nombre completo de la persona, el título que tiene en su empleo, la dirección y el número de teléfono.  También puedes incluir la dirección electrónica.  Asegúrate de que la información esté actualizada.
  • Especifica si tus contactos son referencias profesionales o personales.
  • Quizás puedes mencionar desde cuándo conoces a la persona.
  • Adjunta la hoja de referencias a tu currículum vitae y llévalo a la entrevista. Esto demostrará que has ido preparado.

Asegúrate de avisarles a las personas de tu lista de referencias que has proporcionado esta información personal. De esta manera, ellos estarán preparados cuando reciban la llamada y sabrán a que puesto estás postulando. Si tú piensas que las personas de tu lista de referencias deberían saber algo específico acerca del puesto que estás solicitando, asegúrate de comunicárselos. Por ejemplo, si estás solicitando un empleo donde tendrás que enseñar, puedes sugerirle a tu referencia que hable de lo bien que te desempeñas cuando trabajas con niños o acerca tu experiencia enseñando o capacitando a otras personas. Y por último, pero no por eso menos importante, asegúrate de comunicarles a las personas de tu lista de referencias que les agradeces toda su ayuda y avísales si conseguiste o no el trabajo. ¡Buena suerte!    

 

download this page (pdf: 224K | doc: 108K)

What is Vocational Rehabilitation?*

Vocational Rehabilitation agencies, often referred to as “VR”, are in every state. VR helps people with disabilities prepare and look for a job. VR was created out of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. VR programs are run by state agencies. They are designed to help people with disabilities meet their career goals. They help people with disabilities get jobs, whether the person is born with a disability, develops a disability or becomes a person with a disability while working.

Vocational Rehabilitation Services [what they can help you with]

  • Eligibility Determination: Helps you to figure out if you can actually get the services
  • Assessment of vocational needs – Finds out about your interests, skill and services you may need
  • Development of your Individualized Plan for Employment – Outline of your goals and the services you need/will receive
  • Coordination of services – Helps in getting the services you need to reach your goals
  • Post-employment services – Helps you keep your job once you get it

Do you qualify for services from VR?

According to the federal government, if you are:

  • An “individual with a disability”, meaning a person who
    • Has a physical or mental disability that is a sizable (big) obstacle (block) to getting a job
    • Can benefit from VR services to get a job
  • An individual who needs VR services to prepare for, get or keep a job
  • If you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and/or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, you can receive VR services.

Vocational Rehabilitation services may be different from state to state. To find your state VR, see this website, www.jan.wvu.edu/SBSES/VOCREHAB.HTM. You can find your state and click on it for information about how to get in touch with them to find out more.

*Translated from “Getting the Most from the Public Vocational Rehabilitation System”, by Colleen Condon, Cecilia Gandolfo, Lora Brugnaro, Cindy Thomas and Pauline Donnelly for the Institute for Community Inclusion

Need to Pass a Drug Test?
Toxin Rid 10 Day Detox Program
Aloe Toxin Rid Shampoo + Zydot Ultra CleanMega Clean + PreCleanse Pills
Powdered Human Urine
toxin rid cannabis detox kit
Aloe toxin rid and zydot ultra clean
MegaClean THC detox drink
Powdered Urine Kit
$189.95 $209.99$235.90$69.95$43.95
More information
More information
More information
More information

Comments0

Leave a Reply

*

code